Dating sites psychology

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  1. Cupid's algorithm: Do dating sites know love's formula? - BBC News
  2. Online Dating: A Critical Analysis From the Perspective of Psychological Science
  3. The Psychology of Dating Websites
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Reis University of Rochester , and Susan Sprecher Illinois State University take a comprehensive look at the access, communication, and matching services provided by online dating sites.

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Cupid's algorithm: Do dating sites know love's formula? - BBC News

Although the authors find that online dating sites offer a distinctly different experience than conventional dating, the superiority of these sites is not as evident. Dating sites provide access to more potential partners than do traditional dating methods, but the act of browsing and comparing large numbers of profiles can lead individuals to commoditize potential partners and can reduce their willingness to commit to any one person.

Communicating online can foster intimacy and affection between strangers, but it can also lead to unrealistic expectations and disappointment when potential partners meet in real life.

Creating an Attractive Online Dating Profile

As online dating matures, however, it is likely that more and more people will avail themselves of these services, and if development — and use — of these sites is guided by rigorous psychological science, they may become a more promising way for people to meet their perfect partners.

Hear author Eli J. I agree wholeheartedly that so-called scientific dating sites are totally off-base.

Online Dating: A Critical Analysis From the Perspective of Psychological Science

They make worse matches than just using a random site. They also have a very small pool of educated, older men, and lots more women. Therefore they often come up with no matches at all, despite the fact that women with many different personality types in that age group have joined. They are an expensive rip-off for many women over My mother and father had very few hobbies and interests in common, but because they shared the same core values, their love endured a lifetime.

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I met a few potential love interests online and I never paid for any matching service! I did my own research on people and chatted online within a site to see if we had things in common. If that went well, we would have another date.


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  • The Tinder effect: psychology of dating in the technosexual era | Media Network | The Guardian;
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  • Love is blind?

I am currently with a man I met online and we have been together for two years! We have plans to marry in the future. I myself would probably start looking right away since looking for love online is a lengthy process! I knew this man 40 years ago as we worked in the same agency for two years but never dated. Last November I saw his profile on a dating site.

My husband had died four years ago and his wife died 11 years ago. We dated for five months. I questioned him about his continued online search as I had access to his username. I think he has been on these dating sites for over 5 years.

The Psychology of Dating Websites

Needless to say I will not tolerate this and it was over. No-one seems very interested in making an actual purchase or commitment. Thanks to the proliferation of online dating, would-be couples are now almost as likely to meet via email or a virtual "wink" as they are through friends and family. In , when the Internet was still in its infancy, less than 1 percent of Americans met their partners through personal ads or matchmaking services.

Single people have more options than ever before, as websites such as Match.

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But that may have a downside. According to a new review of online dating written by a team of psychologists from around the country, dating websites may warp a person's outlook and expectations in ways that can actually lower the chances of building a successful relationship. It allows people access to potential partners they otherwise would not have," says Eli J. One of the weaknesses of online dating is an over reliance on "profiles," the researchers say. Although most dating websites feature photos and detailed, searchable profiles covering everything from personality traits to likes and dislikes, this information isn't necessarily useful in identifying a partner, Finkel and his coauthors write.

That's partly because daters don't always know what they want in a mate -- even though they generally think they do. Studies suggest that people often lack insight into what attracts them to others and why , and therefore the characteristics they seek out in an online profile may be very different from those that will create a connection in person, the review notes.

Finding love online, despite health problems. The abundance of profiles online also may make daters too picky and judgmental, the authors say. The sheer number of options can be overwhelming, and the ease with which people can sift through profiles -- and click on to the next one -- may lead them to "objectify" potential partners and compare them like so many pairs of shoes.

The shopping mindset may be efficient online, but when carried into face-to-face interactions it can make daters overly critical and discourage "fluid, spontaneous interaction" in what is already a charged and potentially awkward situation, Reis and his coauthors write. Communicating via email or instant message before meeting in person doesn't always cure this problem.

Some online communication is a good thing, the researchers say, but too much of it can skew expectations and ultimately sabotage a match. People tend to read too much into emails and other online conversations, which increases the potential for misunderstandings and disappointment, they point out.